Craig Fitzgerald's Biggest Fan's picture

Craig Fitzgerald's Biggest Fan


North Carolina

Member since 09 August 2016 | Blog

Software engineer who enjoys strength training and Penn State athletics.

Favorites

  • SPORTS MOMENT: Witnessing 2 Penn State national championships in person so far
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYER: Carl Nassib

Recent Activity

Comment 03 Apr 2017

It's great to have a successful team in another sport! A majority of the states Penn State gets students out of are great at lacrosse (New York, New Jersey, Maryland) so it makes sense we'd start getting good recruits in that area too. Seems like all teams which benefited from Pegula's donation are faring well!

Comment 12 Mar 2017

It's also true that these coaches on great teams are in close game scenarios against other great programs/great teams, so it tends to even at .500, It'd be hard to isolate it beyond that, plus I don't necessarily care about Duke's close game luck against teams like Wake Forest.

Comment 16 Feb 2017

"They came three times to see him in total."

Is that normal? I could see an argument for either saying that sounds way too low, or feels thorough since we're talking about seeing hundreds of prospects 3 or more times. It's a different situation, but how many times would you estimate the coaches saw Roman Catholic HS play?

Comment 26 Jan 2017

Very Texas/Florida heavy list for those 2018 offers. Some stats:

  • 2016: 178 total scholarship offers, 4 in Texas (2.25%), 33 in Florida (18.54%)
  • 2017: 182 total offers, 6 in Texas (3.30%), 27 (14.84%) in Florida. 3.30%/14.84% respectively
  • 2018: 106 total offers, 8 in Texas (7.55%), 19 in Florida (17.92%)


Seems like an intentional effort to get more offers into an elite state early on in the process. Maybe getting offers in early in Texas is disproportionately valuable over getting in offers early in Virginia, where we're below our pace during this cycle (2016: 7.30%, 2017: 9.34%, 2018 2.83%). We're also fairly behind typical pace in Georgia, perhaps because we haven't had a satellite camp there recently.

We've offered 15, 12, and 13 guys from Pennsylvania in the last 3 cycles. Seems like the prospects within driving distance get scouted during their junior year and their offer is a done deal early on in the process. This makes sense if we're trying to #DominateTheState

Comment 26 Jan 2017

Just 2.4% of the top linebackers come from Pennsylvania, but only 2.7% of all blue chip prospects come from Pennsylvania: http://www.sbnation.com/college-football-recruiting/2016/6/28/12040586/rankings-state-stars-florida-texas-california

I don't think it's necessarily a case of Brent Pry not being a good recruiter, but it's a case of Gattis, Huff, or recently Terry Smith just being better. Brent Pry is fine at his job, but any team pulling in as many 4*/5* as Penn State is going to have positions where they're particularly strong, and it seems like recruiting quality as it relates to on field success isn't a tide that raises all positional ships.

How much stock do you put in rankings like these? They seem to oversimplify the process and overly credit a single coach. They do show Brent Pry as great this year, but not showing up at all in previous years: http://247sports.com/Season/2017-Football/CompositeCoachRankings?Conference=Big-Ten 

Comment 02 Jan 2017

Sad end to an amazing season. I don't see any compelling reason we don't end the year ranked top 6, maybe top 5.

This year was a great reminder of how fun college football can be. A welcomed reminder after the past few seasons of middling at .500

Comment 20 Dec 2016

As long as coaches can leave early, players should be able to as well. Coaches can recruit for their new team while gameplanning for the bowl their current team is in (see Lane Kiffin, Kirby Smart).

College is for preparing you for your real world job. For 95%+ of college football players, this means going pro in something other than sports. But for those select few, it makes sense. No one would fault someone who majored in Entrepreneurship or Management for leaving school early because their business idea took off a year earlier than they graduated.